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Image: Keith PaisleyImage: Chris Drury

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Wave Chamber

Chris Drury, 1996

Wave Chamber is a small structure that works as a camera obscura, projecting an image of the lake's surface onto the floor inside.

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Wave Chamber is a camera obscura, projecting an image of the water onto the floor of a small stone structure. Within the dark interior the walls echo the wave sounds and the floor appears to become liquid. The building takes the form of a drystone beehive on the shoreline with a small door to allow access. Although the interior initially appears very dark, as your eyes adjust to the low light level a moving image of waves on the lake appears on the floor if by magic.

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From Hawkhope Car Park (across the dam) follow the Lakeside Way along the north shore of Kielder Water. A little over half a mile along the track, the path to Wave Chamber is signposted on the left.

Please note that the final section of path is a rough forest track with steps in places and is not suitable for wheelchairs. Total distance from Hawkhope car park is 1 mile, (approximately 25 minutes) walk time.

A good way to explore all the artworks along the Lakeside Way is by cycle. Bikes should be to at least hybrid cycle grade with decent country tyres for the changing terrain of Kielder Water & Forest Park.

OS map ref: NY696883

In Wave Chamber, the artist has created an artwork that separates out just one of the many experiences of the Kielder landscape, in this case the light on the water and the restless forms of the waves on the lake. The structure does not try to cut the visitor off completely though as the sound of the wind and waves can be heard from inside and tiny points of light can be seen shining through small gaps in the stonework.

Wave Chamber works as a camera obscura with the lens and mirror angled at the reservoir, so that the rippling surface of the water is projected oand focused onto the pale floor of the chamber.

Wave Chamber was constructed by local drystonewaller Don Golden and his son Gavin over a 3-week period, using 82 tons of local stone and without the need for any cement.

Don said “We just built it our own way, me doing the outside and Gavin the inside. We didn’t use scaffolding – we just left bits of stone sticking out to climb on while we put it together. The stone came from Ladycross Quarry at Slaley, and was brought out to us by boat".

Visitors should note that it takes several minutes for your eyes to adjust to the low light inside the chamber and the image is clearer in the middle of the afternoon when the sun faces the mirror most directly. On bright sunny days when there is also enough wind to create waves on the lake the image will be most distinct.

"I wanted to see the world with openness, not from a fixed point. So I began using the very stuff of the world."

Chris Drury seeks to make connections between different phenomena in the world, specifically between:

- Nature and Culture
- Inner and Outer
- Microcosm and Macrocosm

All of his works, over the past 25 years have been concerned with these connections. This is what unites the whole body of work. He does not have a particular style, nor does he prefer one material or process over another, rather he will seek the most appropriate means and material to find, and make explicit, those connections.

To this end he collaborates with scientists and technicians from a broad spectrum of disciplines and technology. This may mean that one exhibition or work outside may look very different to another. Each work starts from zero and breaks new ground. Its starting point is the place and/or the situation. His work therefore is a continuing dialogue with the world, exploring our place in the universe.

Chris Drury has had solo exhibitions and contributed to group shows across the world. In his quest to work in the world's wildest places, he has also traveled to Sri Lanka, Ladakh, Colorado, New Mexico and Lapland, as well as working in the Western Isles and south western Ireland. He lives in Lewes, Sussex.   

Further information on the artist can be found at www.chrisdrury.co.uk

 

 

In Wave Chamber, the artist has created an artwork that separates out just one of the many experiences of the Kielder landscape, in this case the light on the water and the restless forms of the waves on the lake. The structure does not try to cut the visitor off completely though as the sound of the wind and waves can be heard from inside and tiny points of light can be seen shining through small gaps in the stonework.

Wave Chamber uses a mirror and lens mounted in the top of the building to capture the light that bounces off the water just beyond of the Belling. The mirror turns the light down into the interior where the lens focuses it on the floor of the chamber. Wave Chamber was constructed from 82 tons of local stone by the artist working with a local drystone waller.

Visitors should note that it takes several minutes for your eyes to adjust to the low light inside the chamber and the image is clearer in the middle of the afternoon when the sun faces the mirror most directly. On bright sunny days when there is also enough wind to create waves on the lake the image will be most distinct.

To the west of the Wave Chamber is the Belling inlet and beyond that visitors will be able to see both 55/02 and the Belvedere. 55/02 is approximately 2.25 miles away and the Belvedere 3.25 miles. 2.5 miles to the east beyond Kielder Dam is the village of Falstone and the site of Stell.